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MOSES MCKISSACK III

Moses McKissack III was the grandson of an African-born slave who became a master builder. Moses III joined his brother Calvin to form one of the earliest African-American architectural firms in the USA. Building on the family legacy, the firm of McKissack and McKissack has designed thousands of facilities.

 

WILLIAM SIDNEY PITTMAN

During a brief yet innovative career, William Sidney Pittman was commissioned to design several important buildings in Washington, DC. Often reaching for the unexpected in his work, Pittman died penniless at the age of 82.

WALLACE RAYFIELD

While Wallace Augustus Rayfield was a student at Columbia University, BOOKER T. WASHINGTON recruited him to head the Architectural and Mechanical Drawing Department at Tuskegee Institute in Macon County, Alabama. After a few years, Rayfield opened his own practice in Birmingham, Alabama, where he designed many homes and churches. Rayfield was the second professionally-educated black architect in the United States.

ROBERT ROBINSON TAYLOR

Educated at MIT, Robert Robinson Taylor was America’s first formally trained architect. Like Wallace Rayfield, Taylor spent time teaching at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and met the prominent Black educator and leader Booker T. Washington. Robert Robinson Taylor designed several buildings at Tuskegee Institute and he helped other African Americans launch careers in architecture.

JULIAN ABELE

Julian Abele was one of the major American architects, but he never signed his work and it was not publicly acknowledged. Abele’s original architectural drawings for Duke University have been described as works of art with exquisite in detail.

ALBERT IRVIN CASSELL

Albert I. Cassell shaped many academic communities in the United States. He designed buildings for Howard University in Washington D.C., Morgan State University in Baltimore, and Virginia Union University in Richmond. Cassell also designed and built civic structures for the State of Maryland and the District of Columbia.

JOHN E. BRENT

The first African American to become a professional architect in Buffalo New York, John E. Brent designed Buffalo’s Michigan Avenue YMCA. The building became a cultural center for the black community in Buffalo.

LOUIS BELLINGER

For more than a quarter of a century, Louis Bellinger designed key buildings in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, only a handful of his buildings have survived.

JEWEL VERTNER WOODSON TANDY

Jewel Vertner Woodson Tandy was the first registered black architect in New York State and the first Afro-American to belong to the prestigious AIA (American Institute of Architects). Tandy designed landmark homes for some of the wealthiest residents.

PAUL WILLIAMS

Paul Williams became renown for designing major buildings such the Los Angeles International Airport and over 2000 homes in Southern California. Many of the most beautiful residences in Hollywood were created by Paul Williams.

CLARENCE W. WIGINGTON

Wigington was the first registered African American architect in Minnesota and the first African American municipal architect in the United States. He designed schools, fire stations, park structures, municipal buildings, and other important landmarks in St. Louis Minnesota.

J MAX BOND JR

New York architect J. Max Bond, Jr. designed many office buildings, libraries, and university research facilities. With his firm, Davis Brody Bond Aedas, he helped flesh out and complete plans for the in New York City. A respected teacher at City College and Columbia University, Bond inspired a generation of minority architect.

ROBERT TRAYNHAM COLES

Robert Traynham Coles is noted for designing on a grand scale. His works include the Frank Reeves Municipal Center in Washington DC, the Ambulatory Care Project for Harlem Hospital, the Frank E. Merri weather Library, the Johnnie B. Wiley Sports Pavilion in Buffalo and the Alumni Arena at the University of Buffalo. Founded in 1963, Coles’ firm ranks as one of the oldest in the Northeast owned by an African American.

NORMA MERRICK SKLAREK

Norma Merrick Sklarek was the first Black woman to become a licensed architect in New York and California. She was also the first Black woman honored by Fellowship in AIA. Her many projects include the Pacific Design Center in California a new terminal for Los Angeles International Airport.

 

 

 

 

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